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Taiwan Geography and Population

Taiwan (Geography)

Taiwan consists of the main island and many smaller islands, including Penghu Lietao (Pescadors), Mazu and Qimei (Quemoy). The latter two, which are close to mainland China, are heavily fortified and have been the subject of repeated tensions in the area.

Taiwan Geography

East of a fault line that runs through the island, lies the Zhongyang Mountains with the island's highest mountain, Yu Shan (3952 m). To the east, the mountains slope steeply down towards the Pacific Ocean. The eastern two thirds of the country consists mainly of rugged mountains, and there is only the possibility of smaller settlements. To the west, the landscape slopes less steeply downwards and forms flat plains, where the main cities are located, and the country's economic activity mainly takes place. The cultivable area, which accounts for only 1/4of the island's total area, is also located here. Taiwan is located in an earthquake zone. The chi-chi earthquake of September 1999 was of magnitude 7.3 on the Richter scale and caused extensive damage. The country is also regularly hit by tropical cyclones. They often occur in late summer and cause damage to buildings and crops. The climate is also relatively hot, humid and windy for large parts of the year. The whole island is located in the tropical monsoon belt. From November to March, winds from the Chinese mainland blow and provide significant rainfall in the northern part of the island, while the rest have a drier and sunnier climate. The average temperature in the coldest months is 15-17 C. From May to October, the climate is characterized by the SW monsoon, which brings rain to the south, while the northern parts receive less rainfall. The average temperature in the warmest months is around 30 C. There falls gnsntl. approximately 2500 mm of rain per year.

Population and occupation

Taiwan Population

The population is ethnically homogeneous, predominantly Chinese, but immigrants from the mainland and their descendants make up a minority of 14%. On the western coastal plains the population density is high; here are also the country's three most important urban areas, Taipei, Kaohsiung and Taichung.

  • Countryaah: Do you know how many people there are in Taiwan*? Check this site to see population pyramid and resident density about this country.

Agriculture. Taiwan has few mineral resources but developed in the first half of 1900-t. a rich agriculture on the fertile alluvial soils. The Japanese colonists wanted to develop the island into Japan's rice chambers and therefore implemented a simplification of the attachment system as well as a number of productivity-enhancing measures, including irrigation systems. After World War II, agriculture developed further through increased use of fertilizers, new improved varieties and mechanization. A number of new crops were also introduced, including was landed major exporter of canned asparagus and mushrooms. However, the role of agriculture as an exporter was surpassed by industry in the late 1960's.

Industry. The Japanese had established some heavy industry in the latter part of the colonial period, but many factories were destroyed after World War II. Along with Chiang Kai-shek came a number of textile manufacturers, who brought equipment and experience to the island. With the help of the Americans, other light industry was also established in the 1950's, and in the 1960's, local companies began to export, while multinational companies set up export-oriented companies. With the aim of supporting local arms production and generally increasing local value added in the industry, a significant heavy industry was built up during the 1970's, supplying semi-finished products, machinery and components to the export industry. In the 1980's, the focus was on conversion to knowledge-intensive, high-tech production, for example in the technology park in Hsinchu, and among other things, it was established. a significant computer industry. From the middle of the decade, labor-intensive production was pushed out of the island by high land prices, wage increases, forced revaluations of the currency as well as stricter requirements for environmental measures. Initially, the relocation was aimed at South-East Asia, but from around 1991, many companies were seized by the "China fever", and by the end of 1995, more than 30,000 companies had made investments totaling DKK 30 billion. US dollars in China. Ten years later, the investment amount had doubled and perhaps tripled. but from about 1991, many companies were gripped by the "China fever", and by the end of 1995, more than 30,000 companies had made investments totaling $ 30 billion. US dollars in China. Ten years later, the investment amount had doubled and perhaps tripled. but from about 1991, many companies were gripped by the "China fever", and by the end of 1995, more than 30,000 companies had made investments totaling $ 30 billion. US dollars in China. Ten years later, the investment amount had doubled and perhaps tripled.

Development strategy. Behind Taiwan's successful economic development into a modern industrial and service society lie a number of different factors. First, both Japanese colonization and significant American aid early supported the country's development. The attachment system was abolished through a series of land reforms in the 1950's, which at the same time got rid of the national enemies of the nationalist government, the landowners. Instead, agriculture was based on small freehold farms. Second, productivity was increased through a comprehensive and efficient consulting service as well as through the establishment of top-level farmers' associations. The state had significant control over development through control of important resources such as water, fertilizers and credit. On the one hand, it made sure to "feed the goose that laid the golden eggs", and on the other hand, it transferred resources to the building of a manufacturing industry and, through price control, ensured that the workers here were given cheap food so that wages could be kept down. Thirdly, the education sector developed early and was continuously expanded in line with the changing needs of the business community. Fourthly, it was possible to withdraw the surplus labor force from agriculture at an early stage, e.g. women, into the light industry, while the labor force was prevented from organizing. Fifth, a controlled market economy was established, in which an almost Leninist-built but strongly anti-communist state took the lead in the country's development. In addition to controlling the peasants and the labor force, the state had control over the financial sector and the country's key industries. Through selective protection and support for new growth industries as well as a management of foreign companies, a coherent industrial development was ensured, and through the requirement for export, it was ensured that this did not become inefficient. From the mid-1980's, a gradual deregulation and liberalization was initiated. Sixth, Taiwanese small businesses took advantage of the opportunities offered by state aid and good world market conditions for export-oriented manufacturing. Small and medium-sized enterprises made up over 95% of the island's businesses and became the cornerstone of the export sector. Many had only a short lifespan, but new ones were added, and many became quality suppliers of components and semi-finished products to large foreign companies. A few evolved into global corporations like the computer giant Acer. The companies developed a formidable ability to follow changing market trends, product specifications and standards in the West and to develop products at a medium-high technological level. Small and medium-sized enterprises continue to provide Taiwan with a flexible business structure, and despite the absence of a welfare state, they have contributed to a relatively equal distribution of income in society. This trend has also been fostered by the fact that Taiwan has one of the world's best educated populations. and despite the absence of a welfare state, they have contributed to a relatively equal distribution of incomes in society. This trend has also been fostered by the fact that Taiwan has one of the world's best educated populations. and despite the absence of a welfare state, they have contributed to a relatively equal distribution of incomes in society. This trend has also been fostered by the fact that Taiwan has one of the world's best educated populations.

 
 
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